Gorgeous Geology

Rock hounding refers to the hobby and pastime of collecting rocks…and I’ve been a ‘hound ever since I was a kid, splashing around one of many North Dallas tributaries of White Rock Creek, where the white limestones are thick as fossilized milk.  There is something about picking up a rock – the sense that you are embarking on a journey to a land so many years back in history that it boggles the mind – and also the hope that there might be a fossil or a valuable gem someplace inside or around the edges.   This is why I can appreciate my husband’s box of rocks, which has has been hauling  around from home to home over the last 50 years.  Meanwhile, I’ve managed to whittle my own ‘rock situation’ down from Code Red (eminent landslide) to Code Yellow (small plastic box taking up coveted space in closet).  While I sometimes regail him with snippets of geological factoids when we pass a rock-cut, I had no idea that he’d eventually become a rock junky again…but that’s just what I think is happening!  Why?  Well, just recently on a trip to one of the best places on earth (for everything rock, including music!), Taos NM, it was *his* idea to return to a local rock shop, where we proceeded to scoop up several nice (yet surprisingly inexpensive) specimens.   We wanted to get at least one from New Mexico, and when we both saw this, we sort of collectively went ‘ooooooooooohh!’ It’s a type of  halite (a member of the salt groups) with blue clouds, from Carlsbad, New Mexico:

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